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The gastronomy of the Canary Islands: where Europe, Africa and America meet

To know the gastronomy of the Canary Islands is to savour their essence. Are you ready for a culinary journey?

Having spent many a happy summer as a child in the Canary Island and happily continuing the trend with my own kids one of the lesser mentioned highlights I find is the food which hand on heart I can tell us exceptional. Part of a holiday for me is trying new foods, new wines, new flavours. Its about experiencing a destination and its offerings. When the below food guide popped into my inbox I couldn’t wait to share it with kind permission from Travel Media.    It’s often said that the Canary Islands are a continent in miniature. This is not only because of the sheer variety of landscapes you find here – from pristine beaches to majestic volcanoes – but also the rich cuisine that each of the islands has to offer. From the north, with its freshly caught seafood, to the south, where the best modern fusion restaurants are located, the Canary Islands offers a sensorial gastronomic journey.

A world of flavours

Tradition and modernity collide in Canarian gastronomy. It even boasts some outstanding emerging young chefs, like Juan Santiago, World’s Best Young Chef 2015 Finalist. He is known for his experimentation based on tradition, the fruit of which are the liquid croquette or the croquette foam among others. As Santiago puts it, with 15 million tourists visiting the Canary Islands every year, it’s inevitable that new tastes and concepts keep emerging. Flavours of Spain, Latin America and Africa cross paths in this archipelago, shaping a very unique identity.

Tenerife for example, the largest of the Canary Islands, is home of the famous papas negras (‘black’ potatoes) and known for guachinches; humble, family-run restaurants where you experience local dishes at affordable prices. Haute cuisine and destination dining also has its place on the island. Five of the six Michelin star restaurants of the Canary Islands are situated on Tenerife. In modern Canarian cuisine, foams and other methods associated with molecular cookery coexist with traditional fish dishes, the ubiquitous mojo sauces, award -winning cheeses and bananas and pineapples famed throughout Europe.

From the net to table

The Atlantic Ocean wraps the Canary Islands, and traditional fishing, regulated by legislation that preserves stocks and marine ecosystems, is a way of life. The waters around the islands are home to an astonishing variety of fish, such as cherne, Atlantic croaker, salema, and sea bream. Whether grilled, baked, marinated or fried, they give a true taste of the Atlantic. Sancocho is a popular, dish of South American origins that consists of salted fish served with potatoes, sweet potatoes, and mojo – the famous sauce of the islands made with olive oil, peppers and assorted spices.

On the island of Gran Canaria, make your way over to the neighbourhood of San Cristóbal and Bar Zurita, a local institution where you can enjoy fresh-off-the-boat octopus and calamari overlooking the sea. Also recommended is La Bahía del Pajar at Arguineguín, or any of the eateries at El Medáno, without doubt the most beautiful beach on Tenerife. If you find yourself on Lanzarote or La Graciosa – the smallest of the Canary Islands – tuck into a plate of tiny, tasty ‘La Santa’ prawns accompanied with nothing but a slice of lemon and a cold beer.

 

 KM Cuisine

Santiago is a strong advocate of the principles of 0 KM; that is to say, “Buying and eating what is local, shortening distances between land or sea and the kitchen and importing as little as possible.” This philosophy has yielded formidable results; for the environment, for producers and most of all our taste buds.

The philosophy of 0 KM has always influenced eating habits on the Canary Islands. The most popular meat is not beef, but pork, rabbit and goat. Goat meat has a strong flavour, and is eaten with your hands. Accompanied with papas arrugadas (small potatoes with a salty crust), it’s perfection.

 

No meal on the Canary Islands is complete without local bread (essential for mopping up any mojo sauce left on the plate); a good wine, such as dry white from La Gomera, one of the world’s most unique wine regions and above all, cheese.

Canarian cheeses, especially those of the islands of Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura, are among the best in the world. In the 2018 edition of the World Cheese Awards, no less than 35 cheeses made on the Canary Islands received awards. Standout farmhouse cheeses include Maxorata; a semi cured goat’s cheese spice with smoky paprika, and Majorero, a firm goat’s milk cheese similar to Manchego. Perhaps the most original cheese is Flor de Guía; a creamy, slightly salty cheese made with an exact combination of cow’s and goat’s milk and liquid extracted from thistle flowers (flors de guía) for the curdling process.

 

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Santa Claus Village -a view from the inside

santa claus village cabins

Pic Credit: The Mamma Fairy Blog

Ever since our visit to Lapland in November/ December 2018 we have quite literally been obsessed about returning. We have been fortunate to have travelled to many countries all over the world but none capturing our hearts in the way Lapland did. If you asked me exactly what it is about Lapland, honestly id struggle to put it into words. There is a magic about it, being in the home town of Santa Claus. Perhaps its seeing the magic of Christmas through my kids eyes.  Last year we stayed at Santa Claus Village and despite my intention of it being a “once in a lifetime” trip we have booked to go back this year later in December.

Since our return, I have shared my trip report and some tips and advice on dressing for lapland  and I have got tonnes of emails and DM’s with questions. I am always happy to chat about my favourite place and happy to answer any questions or queries people planning to visit this wonderful destination have.  The concluding comment of one email I received via my trip report really resonated with me. The query itself was about Santa Claus Village and the email concluded with “can you just imagine working there? How amazing would that be?”.

Santa Claus Holiday Village is run by Marko and Inga and they very kindly took the time to answer some of the questions that I (and many other!) have about running and working in what is probably one of the best known, most magical places in the world.

Our Q & A

Tell us about a typical day at Santa Claus Village

santa claus village at at night

Pic Credit: Marko @ Santa Claus Holiday Village

Well, typical day at Santa Claus Village. I guess we must concentrate on the winter season because that`s our high season. Weather might be little bit chilly, very unusually too cold but plenty of snow. Everything is covered pure white snow, trees are like frosted piece of art statues.  Guests wake up in cosy n warm cottages and go hurried for breakfast, to Christmas House restaurant or Three Elves restaurant, depends on accommodation type which they have booked.  After they have enjoyed typical Scandinavian buffet breakfast, many of them will be waiting booked safaris in the lobby. Some goes for Reindeer Sleigh ride safari and some for Husky Sleigh ride safari or Snowmobiling or some other from our famous excursions.   During the day time we used to have quite a lot day visitors in the Village from other accommodations of Rovaniemi and from around Lapland. They come to meet Mr. Santa Claus and send Christmas greeting cards from Santa Claus Main Post Office and for sure making shopping of very special gifts and souvenirs which we have great selections in the shops of village.

In the afternoon, our guests start to return from safaris and excursions. Many of them go to enjoy in the private sauna in the own cottage and that`s really pleasure after spend chilly day in the winter activities.   In the evening we have delicious dinners available in our restaurants. For coming winter season we will have third restaurant. Restaurant Santa Claus Village, it has 140 seats and shape of teepee.

If the weather looks to be clear for coming night, lot of our guests will be going for different kind of Northern Lights search programs, like Aurora Reindeer safari, Northern Light search in private wilderness or Northern Light search and dinner.

Can you tell us a little about the history of Santa Claus Village

We can think about that story begins from 1950 when city of Rovaniemi built a cottage for Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt when she came to visit in the Arctic Circle.

All the way until 80th  century, tourism was here more or less only summer tourism. Guests from Europe come to visit in the Arctic Circle and was going to North cape, northern most point of Europe. At 80th century Mr. Santa Claus decided that he need a place to greet guests from all over the world and he chose Arctic Circle.

Does Santa ever get a holiday or does he meet guests all year round?

He meet guests here every day for the whole year. In the Christmas Eve he starts he`s journey around world to delivery gifts but he have his magic things in his office, he can stop time for a night and that`s how he have time to make a trip around whole world and Christmas Day morning he will be back in the village greeting his guests.

Where do most of your visitors come from? Europe? or further afield?

Our guests are definitely really from all over the world, I would say that there is not any continental in the earth that we wouldn’t have had guests. It happened some years ago the that we had in the same time in house, without knowing each other, 3 families from New Caledonia. Further than that you can`t come if someone does’t live in the moon. But a lot comes from Europe because it`s not so far away.

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Stena Line – Ferry travel with kids

Dublin port

Departing Dublin Port Pic Credit: The MammaFairy Blog

Long before kids arrived into the Mamma Fairy house we used to travel quite a bit to Holyhead from Dublin. My sister attended University in Bangor in North Wales so we loved popping over for the weekend.  We hadn’t taken the kids on a ferry so there was mega excitement when I told them Stena Line were very kindly taking us and our car to Wales. One of the things that stresses me most about holidays is the airport, the volume of people, the queues, getting myself and the kids through security! The stress levels until we are sitting at the gate are usually pretty high!! Having taken our car on the ferry many times I knew what to expect! Much less stress – literally drive on drive off!

Our Ferry journey with kids

driving onto a ferry

Boarding time!! Pic Credit: The MammaFairy Blog

We were on the 8.10 Stena Adventurer heading over from Dublin to Holyhead on a lovely bright Friday morning in June. Being a Dublin resident I knew how bad Dublin traffic could be so we allowed ourselves extra time just to be sure and I am very glad we did. An incident at Port Tunnel saw the tunnel temporarily closed so thankfully we had time to go the alternative route. Check in closed 30 mins before departure but my advice is to get there early especially if you are travelling in peak work day traffic.

Check in was smooth, we had our boarding passes printed off, we were told which number queue to join and there we were in line to board the Stena Line Adventurer. The absolute squeals out of the kids as we drove onto the boat!!! Once we boarded we were guided into position,  we parked up and took the hyper gang up to the passenger decks. Another tip is to make sure you take everything you need with you as you can’t return to your vehicle when the ferry departs until the ferry docks again.

On board

Good bye Dublin Pic Credit: The MammaFairy Blog

I think one of the first thing you will notice is just how big the ferry is! We had taken the Superfast ferry in the past and the Adventurer is noticeably bigger.  On board the Adventurer there are:

  • En-suite cabins available from €30, might be handy if you have very young kids, for us with older (hyper with excitement) kids it really wasn’t necessary for the short 3 hour crossing. I believe the cabins go up to 4 berth which could be very handy for families.
  • A Hygge Lounge which is a relaxing, peaceful environment if you want a total chill in a large comfy reclining chair as you gaze over the Irish Sea. The cost is €9 per person but you must be over 16 years. If we didn’t have the kids id be in there in a heartbeat. Right up my street!!!
  • There was a restaurant, bar and coffee dock on each passenger deck serving hot and cold snacks and the usual beers and spirits. It was really busy initially on both legs of our trip but the staff were very efficient and the waiting time was short and a lot less busy once the initial rush was finished.
  • There is also the Stena Plus Lounge where for €20 you can avail of complimentary drinks, snacks, newspapers & magazines as well as free wifi, waiter service and comfy seating. We didn’t do it this trip but in the pre kids days we always frequented the lounge, it is really good value and nice and relaxing, a good option for the 3 hours ferry. The was a ‘Family Meal Deal’ on board 2 adults and 2 kids for £23 really good value and you can pay in either € or £.
  • For kids there really is plenty to do; located on each passenger deck is a small play space, for older kids there is “Teen Town” with some arcade games. Much to the kids excitement there is a cinema with free entry. This is a really good option to pass an hour or so especially with younger kids.

Our crossing

Our ship departed on time, boarding was smooth, the sail itself was smooth and the disembarkation was efficient.  What more could you ask for?! To keep the kids entertained I took sketch pads and their trusty twistables! While there is plenty on board to keep them entertained the play centres can get busy so worth having a few of their favourites to keep them occupied.  We took some of their own snacks with us while we ordered coffees, toast and scrambled egg to go with them. Thumbs up for Stena’s scrambled egg.

Our plans

As our trip was so short I had done lots of research before hand to maximise the time we had in North Wales. Full blog post on our activities but for now a very sneak peak…..

Day 1 -We drove to the picturesque town of Llanberis were we stayed on night after our journey on the Snowdon Mountain Railway. We reached the top of Snowdown Mountain literally surrounded by clouds which they kids thought was “epic” the last bit  is a little steep but oh so worth it. Be warned even in summer it can get cold up there so our trusty Reima winter gear came in useful again.

Day 2 – We drove further into Snowdonia to Llechwedd near Blaenau Ffestiniog. Llechwedd is an old slate mine where you can go 50o metres below ground into a deep mine.  I’ll keep you in suspense a little longer for my full review but suffice to say this place left a lasting impression on both us and the kids. Rich our guide a 7th generation miner himself was what made this tour for us. His unique insights, his respect for the heritage of the area and the contribution to mining brought a tear to my eye more than once.

Day 3 – Before heading back to Holyhead we spent a day and night in Llandudno, an old school sea side holiday resort.  While here we also took a quick visit to the Copper mines for a unique self guided tour of 4000 year old mines!!!  We loved our chilled out day here, kids will forever remember playing football at the beach at 10pm then running back to the b&b soaked, tired but happy.

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Itinerary ideas for Iceland

Since our trip last September to Iceland lots of people have asked for tips and advice on what to do to Iceland, sample itineraries, “must see” attractions.   I knew a few of my fellow blog buddies had been to Iceland I thought i’d reach out and get a variety of ideas on their top picks.

waterfall

Pic Credit: The Mamma Fairy Blog

For many people and particularly given just how expensive Iceland is, their preference would be to book via website who can help you book the entire trip in one place.  With WowAir now defunct, there are less flight options for getting to this wonderful destination therefore I can really see how using the services of a site to assist you to book the entire package would be very appealing.  One option im aware of is the Voyage Prive website where they describe themselves as  “a members only luxury travel club, offering unforgettable getaways, at unbelievable prices“.  I love a deal and I know a lot of people like the security of having a packages as opposed to DIY, so well worth checking out and not just for Iceland, there cover worldwide holidays from ski trip to luxury resorts to city breaks.

Iceland “things to do”

The over riding thing I will say about Iceland is that it totally lives up to its reputation as being magical – the scenery is breathtaking, the people friendly and the thermal spas well……you just have to try them. And before you ask……yes it is expensive but to me, and my husband will agree it is totally worth it. It was a bucket list trip for us – a once in a lifetime – but I left a bit of my heart there and I have to go back. We loved it so much

Geysirs in Iceland

Pic Credit: The Mamma Fairy Blog

Our visit was short and we had young kids (6 and 3 at the time of travel) so we carefully planned out itinerary, for a sneak peak of what we did see our Golden Circle trip here my  kids are still asking to go back to that wonderful Ice cream place before Gullfoss. I really do love looking back at our pics, really does make me want to go and book it again.

We also did Fontana as we booked last minute, the Blue Lagoon was booked out. A top tip if the Blue Lagoon is top of your list is to book early. Please also respect the cultural (and hygienic) advice to shower before entering the thermal pools. It was definitely one of the highlights as it was quiet when we were there, we had loads of time and space and the kids were made very welcome. And try the bread – drooling as I type. Quite  honestly the nicest I have ever tasted. It is known as  Geothermal bakery and the break is cooked in the ground for 24 hours!!

 

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Travel Tips for the Whole Family

camera

Pic Credit: Pixabay

Going on holiday is a wonderful, well-needed break from the craziness that is life, particularly when you can get the whole family together and travel with everyone, although that might be just as stressful if you aren’t prepared. Travelling with your whole family might mean travelling with children or seniors, which can be overwhelming if it’s your first time or if you don’t know what to expect. 

Being prepared for any kind of challenges while you’re on a trip can help make everything go smoothly, and knowing what you’re getting yourself into is one of the ways to prepare. Here are some tips for travelling with the whole family.

In general

Give yourself plenty of time to get anywhere. Travelling with children or seniors can make everything take longer than you would think, mainly because you’re thinking in terms of your own speed. Going through airports, eating at restaurants, and getting from place to place will all be slower moving than if you were travelling alone or with a partner, so try and leave lots of buffer time. Try to be at the airport or train station a bit earlier than usual, and don’t jam-pack your daily schedule with too many activities in case you’re late for something – your entire day will be thrown off, and it will become stressful. 

Pre-book as much as you can. Showing up in a foreign city with no hotel reservation doesn’t work if you have kids or elderly parents with you. Make sure you know where you’re staying before you get there, and if you’re travelling by train or bus anywhere, book those in advance as well, so you have a schedule or plan to stick to. Also, pre-booking the entertainment is a good idea, so there’s one less thing on your brain to worry about while on your trip, especially if you’re going on a trip during a holiday period

With kids

walking on runway to flight

Pic Credit: www.themammafairy.com

Always have snacks available. You don’t want your fun excursion turned into a miserable one because of a cranky, hungry, screaming child. There are plenty of reasons why the time between full meals is elongated, like delayed flights or unexpected travel times to your destination, so avoid the tantrum and pack some food the kids can nibble on. Plus then you can sneak some too when you start to lose your own energy. 

Ask for discounts for children. Sometimes discounts aren’t posted but are available, and asking can save you quite a bit throughout your trip. You might be able to get discounts on transportation, tours, entrance fees to attractions like museums, or on food in restaurants. 

With elderly parents

Take it slow. While it’s important to note that some seniors will still have the mobility and ability to travel, there are some conditions like dementia, for example, that are more limiting and require specialised care. It’s vital to check with a doctor or caregiver and get the go-ahead to travel before booking any trips with your elderly family members. Trying to see and do everything at your destination might be overwhelming for a senior, and they might not have the energy for it.

Setting them up for an unenjoyable time will just put undue stress on the whole family, so consider their physical limitations when planning activities. Can they walk around for long periods of time? Is there a lot of standing required, and can they handle it? If it’s outdoors, will the weather be comfortable? There are a few aspects to consider, and it might be helpful to discuss this with them prior to booking anything. 

Note: This is a collaborative post
Fairy Travels

Top things to do in the Canary Islands

Many moons ago in our pre kid days we spent some wonderful long weekends in Lanzarote with a couple who we are great friends with. With 6 kids between us and an ongoing vow to return en masse we just haven’t had the change. Skimming my inbox last week a press release from Travel Media really caught my eye “Top ten things to do in the Canaries“.  With kind permission I have included their fantastic guide below. Given holiday season is almost upon it, I thought the timing perfect to share this as no doubt a good percentage of you will be heading this direction over the coming weeks. If there is anything you think missed of the list do send on or comment below.

Get to the top of the Teide Volcano in Gran Canaria

Just after Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea in Hawaii, Mount Teide is the third highest volcano in the world. Located in Gran Canaria, it’s tone of the most visited natural parks in Europe and the 8th most visited in the world!  If you opt to take the cable car which travels within 500 meters of the summit – prepare yourself for some simply breathtaking views.

Climbing Mount Teide is also an option as well as a dream for many; ascending the crater and smelling the sulphur emitted from volcanic fumaroles is a once-in-a-lifetime experience.  There’s a bar and restaurant area, and even a hotel and a refuge at 3.270 meters.

As the highest peak in Spain, it has been a World Heritage Site since 2007, and the park encourages visitors not stray from the marked paths, enjoy the native flora and fauna of this geological treasure, and not to take stones as a souvenir of the National Park.

Sunbathe at Maspalomas Beach in Gran Canaria

With wind-sculpted dunes with golden sand and clear, crisp ocean – Maspalomas truly is one of the most beautiful beaches on the Canary Islands.   Stretching just over 3km, the beach makes for the perfect place to sunbathe, to take a relaxing stroll or to simply soak up the sunset in the evenings. One of the best spots to see the sunset is the first set of dunes by the Charco de Maspalomas lagoon.

The beach stretches from the beautiful lighthouse to La Punta, the most southern point of the Island. But, it doesn’t end there! It then transforms into the Playa del Inglés, another 4 km of the finest sand in the east.

 Visit the fascinating architectural legacy of César Manrique in Lanzarote  

César Manrique was an artist, architect and environmental activist from Lanzarote. He did not create in nature but rather with it, and his relationship with the landscape was not simply aesthetic but also a commitment to defending the environment.

Jameos del Agua is a volcanic tube opened on the surface where you can admire a natural lagoon of transparent emerald waters which is home to a native species of the island – a minuscule, albino, blind and gleaming little crab of unknown origin.

Mirador del Rio is a building located at 500 meters in altitude at the top of the Risco cliff, hidden beneath the rock and barely visible from the outside, with large windows and exterior balconies that provide a stunning view of Lanzarote.

Visitors can see traditional ceramics and a range of sculptures. The domed main room and cupolas are not to be missed.

Taste volcanic wine in Lanzarote 

The Canary Islands have become an exceptional wine-producing region due to the volcanic nature of their soils and almost desert-like climate. The ash coating retains moisture, protects buried soils from erosion, inhibits evaporation, and traps solar input.

Partially ringed by almond shaped stone walls on tar dark soils, the vine arrays appear hauntingly gorgeous, and many of them are included within Timanfaya National Park in the southwest.

White wines are predominant in the Canaries and are often opulent and full, sometimes with a citric precision.
Whereas red wines often have a Burgundian heft of pepper and complex darkness-leather, mocha, black fruit, caramel and even diesel.
Several wineries across Lanzarote offer both wine tastings and visits.

Try an aloe vera wellness treatment in a Canarian spa in Tenerife 

The spa centres in the Canary Islands are well-known and make full use of all the natural resources provided by the Canary environment. Plenty of unique treatments are offered such as thalassotherapy, geotherapy, wine therapy or aloe therapy.

The spa of the Iberostar Grand Mencey in Santa Cruz de Tenerife is set over 4500 square meters, and facilities include everything from a dynamic heated pool with bubble beds, whirlpool sections, and aqua-massage swan necks, to saunas, a foot spa, and a steam room. Sounds like my ideal kind of holiday!

Watch the stars from a world class observatory in La Palma

The sky of La Palma is one of the best places to observe the stars, and the Roque de los Muchachos observatory at 2.396 m. above sea level is home to one of the most extensive fleets of telescopes to be found anywhere in the world.

It boasts a breath-taking view of a giant volcanic crater 1,500 metres deep, covered in trees and with volcanic rocks in amazing formations.

The observatory organises visits to its facilities, and there are stargazing tours by La Palma Astronomy Tours which even include a ‘Tapas and Stars’ experience. The experience combines tapas and a glass of red and/or white local wine with an introduction to the astronomy and the orientation of the sky through constellations as well as insider information from guides.

Eat at a Michelin star restaurant in Tenerife

The stars in the Canary Islands are not just in the sky: Tenerife has six Michelin stars spread across five restaurants. One starred NUB occupies a beautifully restored colonial building and the tasting menu fuses Italian, Chilean and traditional Canarian flavours.

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Dressing for Lapland – what to wear

After writing this post on our guide to our Lapland DIY trip last year, I received a lot of messages on dressing for Lapland. Even some asking where fluffy pjs were a necessity! In this post ill go through what we wore and where we got the items.

I think it easier to put it all together in one post as I know before we went I did a lot of research to make sure the kids would be nice and toasty. For context we went end November into December so temperature range for us was -6 to -12 and there was snow.  Visit Finland has a brilliant informative video which is well worth a watch.

Ill focus on the kids but you can take it that adults broadly similar. However I did adopt the adult plus one thinking. As in what we wore plus a layer!

So…starting from the feet up.

  • Wool socks – a must! We went for pure wool, just one pair not too tight and they were prefect. I purchased our via Ali Express

    snow gear kids

    Kids in their Reima gear Pic Credit: The Mamma Fairy

  • Boots – goes without saying. Comfortable and waterproof. Make sure to try on with your wool socks before you go! A family in the cabin next to us were left with too small boots with the socks on. Luckily they could rent the boots on site. Ours and kids were Campri from Sports Direct, purchased this time last year in the sale.
  • Thermals – Don’t scrimp on these as you will were them all the time. Again try before you go. Kids wore Reima and were fantastic, soft and a great fit
  • Regular top/ long sleeve t – shirt  – self explanatory!
  • Fleece – This was the kids extra layer, myself and the Dada Fairy didn’t seem to need this layer but the kids did and both had hooded fleeces from Reima, again, couldn’t fault the quality and functionality.
  • Jacket – As with the boots this is your first line of defence! Ensure its a good fit accounting for the extra layers and it has a good hood and waterproof! Kids again had Reima and the jackets were exceptional. The fit, the hoods and the ability to withstand the temperatures at -12 and not a moan or a groan. No mean feat for my kids who leave the heat. Yes they are a little pricey but you get what you pay for and I really didn’t want to go all that way for the kids not to enjoy due to the cold which they weren’t accustomed to. The kids wore the jackets all winter here and was sorry to retire them to next year. They are safely put away until our adventures in December.
  • Ski trousers – As with the jacket, these are a necessity. There is snow! Kids being kids love to roll in it, make snow angels etc! They will get wet! And nobody wants to sitting in wet clothes. Kids decked out again in Reima no leaks, no wet trousers, no moans. Full marks from us.
  • Hats/ snoods – Very important, particuarly the snood and your neck can be exposed and the skin there is quite light and can really feel the cold. All of ours from Regatta

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Junior Explorers at Croke Park

Croke Park Junior Explorers

Super excited for the Junior Explorers tour

One chilly Saturday morning a couple of weeks back we were invited to Croke Park to experience their Junior Explorers tour which runs Saturday mornings at 10.30 until 18th May.  Coming from a family of GAA fanatics I was so excited of this tour. Croke Park for the GAA fanatic is iconic.  The very notion that I would get to explore the dressing room, the players lounge, get to walk out the players tunnel was like fulfilling a childhood fantasy.  My husband brought my back to Earth quickly…this tour was for the kids!!!

Croke Park Junior Explorers

Having a nosey at the Dublin jerseys

The tour stars with meeting Cluasóg the Irish hare who greets you upon arrival. Following this you begin your tour experiencing behind scenes of this stadium. First up the dressing room with the county jerseys all hanging neatly along the walls. The kids despite being Dubs made a beeline for the Donegal jerseys much to their fathers delight!! Next up was the players lounge which houses a mighty impressive Waterford Crystal chandelier. It’s seriously wow.

Next up we saw the warm up area and then the kids (and my) favourite part…..run out pitchside through the players’ tunnel. The look of sheer excitement in my oldest’s face will stay with me forever. He went back and did it many times. Its the stuff dreams are made of. Its given him incredible focus to one day tog out in his county colours and run out on the pitch. The sheer scale of the stadium can only really be appreciated from the pitch side. Looking up from the tunnel sent a shiver down my spine.

Croke park Junior explorers tour

Pitch side – in the words of my oldest “epic”

Hand on heart in the words of an almost 7 years old this was “epic” the boys loved every minute. Tours lasts approx. 1.5 hours (including time in the museum and a meet and greet with Cluasóg) and the route is fully accessible for buggies. Advance online booking is recommended. Free parking is available which is a mega plus!

Honestly you wont regret it. Tour participants can explore the museum afterwards with their  Junior Explorer Passport so they can follow clues throughout the Museum  including some very fun interactive features. We rounded our morning off with a tasty coffee at the Blackthorn Cafe.  Tour prices are below and its recommended to book in advance:

 

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Ultimate Guide To Goa With Children

Who doesn’t love enjoying a serene sight of sunset sitting on the beach, or indulging in some amazing water sports, or wandering in the vibrant flea markets? Well, then you need to be in Goa! This is the place that will help you bond with your family and friends. This small city has a variety of amusement activities in store for kids as well.  The city always acts as refreshment when one spends time with their children away from home. If you want to go on a trip with your kids for relaxation and excitement, then Goa is an ideal place where you need to rush.

Best time to visit Goa with kids

The best time to visit Goa is during the onset of autumn or during the spring season, that is, in the month of October and November till February. This is the most pleasant time to visit beaches and monuments of the city. Seaside always has a calm and serene climate during later half of the year, and it is too difficult to stay under the scorching sun between the months of March and June.

 

The monsoon season is not really safe to visit a seaside because of the heavy downpour and thunderstorm hitting the seashore. However, you can still enjoy your rainy season in Goa with your kids and let them experience the beauty of nature. So, it is preferable to visit Goa during autumn or spring or during the winter season.

Tips for visiting Goa with kids

Most of them believe that Goa is a romantic destination. But you must be clear about the fact that this place has something special to offer for each and every individual.

  • It is not just a place with great beaches but there are many museums, monuments, and forts where you can take your kids and let them gain knowledge about history and architecture.
  • Here your little ones can also enjoy water sports such as scuba-diving, para-sailing, boat ride, and much more.
  • Do not forget to taste the yummy fresh seafood of Goa.

What to pack for kids traveling in Goa?


Most of the things you need are available in the local markets of Goa. However, travelling should always be done in a prepared way. Some important things you must remember to take when you are in Goa with your children are: –

  •    A few essential things that you must carry are a hat, a good mosquito repellent and sun-screen. These are must when you are going for trekking or such adventurous activities.
  •    Next comes the first-aid kit that include Paracetamol, cream that prevents rash caused by the heat, band aids, cotton, and Dettol. 
  •    If you have a really small kid, then you must keep a baby carrier that makes you roam around conveniently.
  •    It is very important to carry all your documents with you when you are going on a trip. Identity proofs, photo ids, and emergency contact numbers are a must. Also, see that your kids carry a notepad or a paper with all phone numbers and hotel address on it.
  •    Do carry cash as well as plastic money with you when you are travelling. That is because some vendors will want you to pay cash while others would be okay with plastic money which are debit and credit cards.

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Fairy Travels

Eclectic Edinburgh — 10 travel tips

Edinburgh

Pic Credit: Pixabay

For many visitors, Edinburgh is Britain’s most beautiful city and one of the most scenic capitals in the world.  With an elegant Neoclassical New Town and historic Old Town crowned by a castle perched atop a volcanic rock, it’s no wonder it impresses.  But away from the picture-postcard sights, Edinburgh’s a diverse city with working-class traditions which have fueled and enriched its cultural output and reputation.  If you’re ready for an eclectic Edinburgh tour, here are 10 travel tips.

Trainspotting walking tour

A Trainspotting walking tour with Brit Movie Tours takes you to the real-life filming locations of the cult film in areas like Leith, which are slightly off the typical tourist track. You’ll also learn vital insights about the seminal Irvine Welsh novel that started it all.

Hibernian FC

Known as ‘Hibs’ or ‘the Hibees’ to fans, Hibernian FC are Irvine Welsh’s favourite football team and feature heavily in all of his literature. Catch a game while you’re there and soak up the atmosphere.

Edinburgh Zoo

Edinburgh Zoo is located in Corstorphine, just outside the city centre and it’s home to the UK’s only giant pandas, as well as countless other cool creatures. Well worth a visit.

The Bongo Club

You’ll find The Bongo Club in the city centre’s Cowgate — a cultural hub with live music and comedy venues aplenty. If you want to groove to roots reggae music, Estonian hip-hop or UK Garage, this is the place to get down.

Brew School

Most Scots enjoy their beer, and if you like a tipple too, an Innis & Gunn Brew School session allows you to pick up pro tips from master brewer’s and take home a five litre mini keg of a beer you’ve created yourself.

Scottish Rugby Union

Edinburgh Castle

Pic Credit: Pixabay

Edinburgh’s Murrayfield Stadium is the home of Scotland’s national rugby union team and local side Edinburgh Rugby.  Find tickets at scottishrugby.org and take in a game while you’re in town.

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle is one of the world’s most dramatic and it dominates the city skyline. It’s worth paying for an official tour to learn all about its fascinating history. And if you’re there at lunchtime and hear a loud bang, don’t panic — it’s probably the famous one o’clock gun going off. 

The Scottish Parliament

In Scotland, certain political powers are devolved from the UK parliament at Westminster, so Scottish lawmakers meet and debate legislation at The Scottish Parliament in Holyrood. It’s a marvel of modern architecture that resembles a series of upturned boats.

Edinburgh Trams

The modern Edinburgh tram system is one of the best ways to get around the city and the line extends out as far as the international airport. Book tickets ahead of time on their website.

Edinburgh Airport

Edinburgh is Scotland’s biggest and busiest air hub, with daily flights to countless domestic and international locations. You’ll find Edinburgh airport parking from Looking4.com, popular restaurants like YO! Sushi and boutiques like Michael Kors.

Still looking for more? The Crazy Tourist has a brilliant list of some other tourist hot spots in this wonderful friendly city.

That’s our list! Share your own Edinburgh travel tips in the comments section.

 

Note: This is a collaborative post